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Neil Stratton

Network Switch

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Yes it will, actually.

Automatic MDI/MDI-X is standard on almost all NIC:s and switches nowadays.

 

Also referred to as: Automatic crossover, Auto uplink and trade, Universal Cable Recognition and Auto Sensing

 

"If one of two connected devices has the automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration feature there is no need for crossover cables.

Introduced in 1998, this made the distinction between uplink and normal ports and manual selector switches on older hubs and switches obsolete."

 

It will never hurt to use a crossover-cable, although not necessary.

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Still hoping someone will reply to Neil's question about which network switch (brand and model number) works perfectly right out of the box with WO5, using Windows 7, 32 bit.

 

Anyone?

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Still hoping someone will reply to Neil's question about which network switch (brand and model number) works perfectly right out of the box with WO5, using Windows 7, 32 bit.

 

Anyone?

Just about any switch meets that requirement.

 

The real question should be ...

 

Still hoping someone will reply to Neil's question about which network switch (brand and model number) works perfectly right out of the box with Windows 7, using Windows 7, 32 bit default NIC settings, with my onboard

 

Anyone?

This is NOT a WATCHOUT issue, it is a Windows 7 / hardware interaction issue.

Just because a switch works fine for someone else with their hardware and Windows configuration,

does not guarantee the same will be true for you.

I must be lucky, my seven year old dLink DGS-1005D Gigabit switch has worked fine with Win7 without any adjustments on my part.

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Hi

 

I have setup a Win7 64Bit System on our Shuttle X-PC.

Everything is working fine, but the Network is slow...>(0.25% shown by the Taskmanager on de Production Notebook)

My Solution: Disabling the FlowControl on the Yukon Network Device. Now it is a bit faster than the WinXP Shuttle X-PC. Tommorrow i will check a another Switch

Now its over 25%.

 

Greetings from Germany

Daniel

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Switches that have worked (Windows XP or 7)

NETGEAR "unmanaged switches", both rackmount and desktop

-- 4 port through 48 port

-- 10/100 and 10/100/1000

 

Various other "dumb" switches and some "smart" swtiches, but not "managed" L2/L2+/L3 switches

 

 

Swithces that have not worked

Specifically had issue with an Alctel Lucent OS6850-P48 (48 port Gigabit PoE switch)

-- Tried various settings (multicast and other that I cannot recall) with no luck

-- No matter the settings, data rate was always asbysmal

 

 

Hope this helps to get things started.

 

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He guys,

 

we had the same problem, but we solved it after a thorough search =

In the advanced network-adapter setting = look for Jumbo Packets. Default disabled, but at 4088 (on all machines) the issue was solved!

 

Perhaps this could be tested and added to tweaklist 2.2?

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He guys,

 

we had the same problem, but we solved it after a thorough search =

In the advanced network-adapter setting = look for Jumbo Packets. Default disabled, but at 4088 (on all machines) the issue was solved!

 

Perhaps this could be tested and added to tweaklist 2.2?

 

Absolutely!

 

/jonas

 

Not every setup needs that tweak, in fact, very few do.

That is an adaptation of Windows 7 to make it work with older network switches

that are not truly Windows 7 compliant.

 

So why would you de-tune every WATCHOUT system to accomodate old hardware?

 

A while back, I started to write a post on this, but discovered that different swtiches need

different tweaks. Here is what I had so far, but decieded not to post originally.

 

====================================================================

 

Periodically we hear reports of very slow online / update times

with WATCHOUT under Windows 7.

XP machines in the same cluster do not exhibit speed issues.

 

Research has shown this is not unique to WATCHOUT,

the general Windows population has many similar reports.

 

Apparently there are some subtle changes in Win7

in the way Windows IP networking is implemented.

The change creates slowdowns with some network switches.

 

It seems Win 7 offloads some network duties to the network switch.

I see mention of Win7 certified switches.

But even switches that were not Win7 certified

could be accommodated

with changes to adaptor settings in the

Advanced tab for the network adapter.

 

reference: Slow Network File Copy issues in Windows 7 caused by Remote Differential Compression

reference: Windows 7 Forums ->  Windows 7 - Extremely slow file transfers and network access...

 

I posted this issue to Microsoft (after some further research) and they solved it for me! They asked if my router was on the Windows 7 compatibility list, and that seemed really strange since 802.3 (Ethernet) has been around a long time and why would that suddenly change with the O/S? But I unplugged my PC from the Trendnet Gb router and plugged it into the old Linksys 100Mb and BAM - full network speed! On the Gb router, I couldn't get above 2% in the monitor on a file transfer - on this "compatible" one, I get 100% and file transfers are screaming.

 

=====

From a WATCHOUT user in Canada

When this occurs, a potential fix is to:

go to the Advanced tab for the network adapter,

change IPv4 Checksum Offload to Disabled

 

But I see other settings being offered as a fix,

so it would appear there are multiple issues

that can affect the interaction of Win 7 and the network switch.

 

I found that the thing which fixed it for me was "flow control"

===========

reference: Windows 7 Forums ->  Windows 7 - Extremely slow file transfers and network access...

 

Start \ Run --> ncpa.cpl

right click on adapter ... select properties

click on "configure"

click on "advanced"

highlight the property "Flow Control" and change it to "disabled".

 

This stopped the rate limiting and let my adapter run at full speed.

===========

 

Remote Differential Compression (RDC)

 

reference: http://www.windowsreference.com/windows-7/slow-network-file-copy-issues-in-windows-7-caused-by-remote-differential-compression/]Slow Network File Copy issues in Windows 7 caused by Remote Differential Compression[/url]

<p>

You may experience poor file copy performance over the network in Windows 7 PCs. This could be caused by the Wndows “Remote Differential Compression” engine. Remote Differential Compression is a Windows feature introduced in Windows Server 2003 and is available on all later versions of Windows. This Windows feature is enabled by default in Windows 7.

 

Remote Differential Compression (RDC) allows data to be synchronized with a remote source using compression techniques to minimize the amount of data sent across the network. RDC is different from patching-oriented differencing mechanisms, such as Binary Delta Compression (BDC), that are designed to operate only on known versions of a single file. BDC requires the server to have copies of all versions of the file, and differences between each pair of versions are precomputed so that they can be distributed efficiently from a server to multiple clients.

There seems to be a problem with this Windows 7 and disabling this feature resolves the problem with slow file copy performance.

To disable Remote Differential Compression,

1. Click Start – Control Panel – Programs – Trun Windows features on or off

 

Posted Image

 

2. Uncheck “Remote Differential Compression” and click OK.

3. Restart the computer and you should see an improved performance with copying files.

If there is a similar problem in your Windows Vista PC, you may try this and check if this helps.

But I see other references to the above fix with comments like:

"This has been completely debunked by MS"

 

The Storage Team at Microsoft - File Cabinet Blog

Debunking Myths about Remote Differential Compression and System Performance

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Thanks for the update. I did read the other topic, didn't resolve, but was helpful anyway.

By the way, switch used IS truly win7 compliant, but still, could you elaborate on what this tweak is contributing to this upload error?

 

And if applied whilst using a 'truly win7 compliant' switch, what would be the drawback on using this unnecessary tweak anyway? Would it hurt? Otherwise adding this to the tweaklist will help, since it still happens that separate WO machines are rented out to other companies using their own network setup... (dry hire situations).

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Hi all,

I am trying to implement Watchout V5 into a Network via 2 CISCO 6509 Core switches. The settings in the switches are all defaulted. I am experiencing issues with the display machine not responding well enough to control commands from the production pc. It's rather erratic. 

If I bypass these switches and use a domestic "dumb" gigabit switch then all is good in the world.

However, I have to use the above switches. To bypass them permanently is not an option.

Can anyone help with suggesting settings for these switches to make Watchout respond properly?

Thanks

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Hi all,

I am trying to implement Watchout V5 into a Network via 2 CISCO 6509 Core switches. The settings in the switches are all defaulted. I am experiencing issues with the display machine not responding well enough to control commands from the production pc. It's rather erratic. 

If I bypass these switches and use a domestic "dumb" gigabit switch then all is good in the world.

However, I have to use the above switches. To bypass them permanently is not an option.

Can anyone help with suggesting settings for these switches to make Watchout respond properly?

Thanks

 

I can not tell you how to program a CISCO switch, but I can assist in identifying the goals.

From there, CISCO support should be able to guide you to a solution.

Onyx systems, the integrator who installed a 36 channel WATCHOUT system

at Virginia Beach Convention Center many years ago, experienced 

similar issues integrating into an existing Cisco intranet when they started.

They were able to achieve a stable WATCHOUT system with some tuning.

 

 

Most WATCHOUT communication uses the documented port numbers.
However,  the file server (used for downloading media files) uses a dynamically  
allocated port number. The built-in display computer  
management function uses a dynamically assigned port for its VNC  
connection. Hence, for all these functions to work in their default  
(dynamic) configuration, you really need to have (almost) unrestricted access  
to the computer. Both TCP and UDP traffic must be permitted.
 
Dynamically allocated ports always are greater than 1024,
so if you want to, you should be able to lock down all "well known" port numbers
(ie, all below 1024 which you know you won't be  using).
These "well known" ports are often considered most vulnerable,  
since the kind of service can readily be assumed from the port number,  
so an attacker would have a better idea on what it might attempt on those ports.
 
In theory, once the system has been installed and all media  
transferred (assuming there's no need for VNC remote managment),
it should  be possible to block all ports except the documented ones.
This would, of course, disable the production computer from transferring files,
so it is practically a WATCHOUT write protect for the display computers.
 
 

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Thanks very much for the info. I'll have a crack at this. BTW, not too sure where to find the documentation for port numbers... Can you tell me where to look ,or tell me the numbers?

Cheers.

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First, about the "slow upoads" some have experienced on and off since Win7 was released. This seems to have become much less of an issue lately. I used to see it myself every now and then earlier, but haven't seen it at all now for almost a year. Nor have I heard about anyone experiencing this problem recently. I've never seen it under XP. Note that we haven't changed anything in WATCHOUT to "fix" this. If the problem has indeed gone away, that must be due to changes in recent OS updates.

 

As to funky switches, we ran into another wierd problem last week. Using one particular laptop and one particular switch (a managed netgear switch), we had serious problems making a connection from the production computer to the cluster. It was often very slow in connecting. Sometimes it resulted in a spew of hundreds of error messages in the message window. I connected an old XP computers to the same switch, and loaded the same show. No problem. We switched the laptop that had previously had the problem over to wireless, and unplugged the Ethernet wire. No problem. We went back to Ethernet, and had the problem again. We then moved the other end of the Ethernet cable form the managed switch to another unmanaged switch on the same network. No problem. So, yes, the kind of switch you use can make a difference. In this case it was that particular switch in conjunction with that particular laptop. Go figure...

 

Mike

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